How DMX Might Counsel Obama and Google About China

As I skimmed through my bookmarks held on delicious.com, I came across this particular piece from last week. It is titled “China reports on US human rights record”. It is located in the “Foreign and Military Affairs” section of the online newspaper, Chinadaily.com.cn. According to the article, the Chinese Information Office of the State Council has written a document detailing the Human Rights violations of the United States of America in 2009. The article states that the Human Rights Record of the United States in 2009 was in response to the United States’ Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2009, a report that was commissioned by the US Department of State last week.A pretty bold move on the part of the Western Capitalist society that could considering the United States in pocket to China a mouth watering 1.56 Trillion dollars(source here).

It would also seem as though the US is also attempting to appeal to a world audience the need for internet companies like Google to be allowed to be free of censorship and scrutiny in China. While the content wars between Google and China ensue, a light weight contender is feeding off of the frenzy. Chinese search engine, Baidu has jumped 47% of US market shares. The company’s company’s Nasdaq traded stock is being closely watched by US analyst and fund managers who seek to benefit from the possibility of the website to reap the revenues left behind if Google decides to leave China(source here).

Rewind a little further to when the White House hosted the Dalia Lama, a exiled Tibet leader, which caused a major riff in US and Chinese affairs. The wording of China’s leadership was less than impartial on the subject, including statements that the US should “immediately take effective steps to eradicate the malign effects” that they felt the US had created with the meeting (source here).

All of this, oh, and one more thing, a prominent firm of Silicon Valley, Applied Materials, the world’s biggest supplier of components that are implemented in the manufacture of semiconductors, solar panels and flat-panel displays is moving one of its chief technology officer to China. The company has built a research lab there, and last week held its annual shareholders’ meeting there.According to the New York Times, the company is working in China to produce two-thirds of the world’s solar panels by the end of this year (source here).

As most of my older followers know, I have a tendency of relating the macrocosmic political/economic world to those of the microcosmic. It was very difficult for me not to see the relation of these global interactions with that of drug dealers. I would suppose an explanation might be in order for the uninitiated. In considering these events, I am reminded of a DMX song that I hope that President Obama has somewhere in a playlist on his Ipod….