Black Porn As Liberation

Dr. Mireille Miller Young Studies Black Porn

It is important to explore every element of Black Media as a site of consciousness arousing and US Black Culture as a space of Liberation; even Black Porn. Dr. Mireille Miller-Young studies Black Porn, so I have decided to study Dr. Mireille Miller-Young as she does such.

Dr. Mireille Miller-Young Studies Black Porn

During the past few years strong movements have developed among women and among homosexuals seeking their liberation. There has been some uncertainty about how to relate to these movements.

Whatever your personal opinions and your insecurities about homosexuality and the various liberation movements among homosexuals and women (and I speak of the homosexuals and women as oppressed groups), we should try to unite with them in a revolutionary fashion.

“The women’s liberation and gay liberation movement”
(Transcribed speech)
The Huey P. Newton Reader
Edited by David Hilliard and Donald Weise
pg 157

We should always be interested in how media represents us, and in which ways these representations are spread. As Dr. Mireille explains in this above video, Women of Afrikan and Asian descent have had their bodies photographed while in conditions of slavery and shared as postcards among Whyte peoples. This lack of control as sexual object has subjected these groups of Women to oversexualization to a myriad of forms.

Bi-Directional Stigma Of Black Porn

When asked about misconceptions about Black sex laborers, Dr. Mireille states that stigma develops from two directions. These directions are from:

  • Black Communities that these workers come from projecting a politics of respectability
  • Whytes seeking to project myths of Blacks as savage and oversexed

Both causes derive from a need to justify rape and forced subordination of US Black Women. US Slavery reduced US Blacks to 3/5ths of human, objectified Black Women as breeders of children subject to enslavement and forcibly removed, while holding Black Men in a social position that made it punishable by a fate worst than death to defend their families, or even their own bodies. Dr. Mireille’s work explores how Black Women in a field defined as deviant find a liberation of Self.