5 Things You Should Do Now To Preserve The Integrity Of Black Blogging

1. Hold Your Black Bloggers Up.

 

In many ways, the number reasons for lack of support of Black businesses, offline or online, is that Blacks don’t have a true sense of saving face, or creating their own icons. With an incentive to bolster the efforts of those that have shown a dedication, passion, and respect for craft, it could become a new movement in the Black community in the same way that gang culture and appreciation for the underground crime culture was able to infuse it Self nationwide. It is worthwhile to remember that Cornell West writes and teaches Marxist socialism but praised and was treated dismissively by Jay-Z. If we want better quality content in the media, we have to support those that produce it.

 

Treat your favorite bloggers like that guy who’s book you never read, class you’ve never attended, or lecture you would have fallen asleep in, but always quote at the water cooler after he appears on television. Make sure to let people know where you gleaned that insightful quote or perspective from. If you are in a position to hold conferences, get in contact with your favorite Black bloggers and see if there is a way to include them on the rostrum. Hold your Black bloggers of integrity and worth up in the same manner that some hold up irresponsible Black artists for being…well, irresponsible.

 

2. Don’t treat the donate button as a painting in (Some famous art gallery here), treat like an amusement park ride and become interactive with it.

 

This is a tough one for everybody going into another low economic season, I’m sure. But, it has to be written. Three bucks is enough to get me around the city to gain content, and don’t think that somebody else will do it, you do it. If you have gained anything from a Black blogger, reward that effort. If you don’t want people to sell out, then employ them through your charitable donations and investments. It often takes less than what we believe, if done as a united front.

 

A server and hosting account costs money. I owe $120 due to my host shortly. I can’t run Asylum on RTs alone(although, we do love them, too!). I’m sure I’m not the only great Black blogger of honorable character that you read in the same situation. Facebook, MySpace, even Google are financed by others. This is simply the nature of things. It is difficult for me to respect the hurling of words regarding supporting Blacks, if you aren’t…supporting Blacks(I do so love that device). If you find someone doing that which is beneficial and necessary, don’t automatically assume they’ve got all of their bases covered. Many great organizations might still be around had it not been for beneficiaries overlooking areas of financial interest they could have easily contributed to. Every free service online is being paid for by somebody. It isn’t free to be on the internet. Consider that the next time you scroll by your favorite Black blogger’s donate now button.

 

3. Break out of the social media comfort zone and actually post a comment on the blog and not on Twitter/Facebook.

 

The comment button works, guys. Well, it usually works. And when it doesn’t, please contact me, as Asylum has a great technical staff. I’m sure I’m not only talking for my Self here. Every Black blogger that you respect has the potential to become a thriving community. Twitter and Facebook are only websites, only web applications, only another medium. Yes, I still haven’t stopped having sex with Twitter, but I know she’s just another whore on the strip. These websites that are being driven by the content of Black people with things of interests to you should be come a home;they should be like the housewife of your browsing routine. The same community that is built on a Twitter can be furnished here. The debates that occur on Twitter in 140, would be much better served in the Black blogospheres’ comment sections.

 

4. Diversify.

 

We aren’t all on the same team, we don’t shoot at the same cans in the alley, and we shouldn’t be forced to play nice in your bookmarks folder. Black bloggers come in various shapes and sizes, trust me, I’ve seen a few naked, I know what I’m talking about here. Don’t place me in the same folder as @RippDemUp(click here as well), I love the brother, and so does Asylum, but what he does for you is not necessarily the same gift you should expect from these parts. Black people, especially young Blacks that were programmed by hip hop to view most everything as a sporting competition, have an indeed troubling cultural expression of thinking all cultural expressions should be pitted against another another. I don’t have to take sides. I like reading the blogs of very polar thinkers, comparably, as well as extremely shallow writers that never take a determined stance on issues. Mix up your reading, expand your mind.

 

5. Spread love the interweb way: post the links to the content elsewhere.

 

Share the love with your Twitter following. Use the link to one of your favorite Asylum posts as content for discussion in your g+ circles. Impress your family and friends with your interweb resourcefulness. Use a portion of the article and a link to gain notoriety on one of your most frequented forums. However you do it, help those Black bloggers that show their integrity and dedication by connecting them to the web more. It doesn’t take much to copy and paste the web address from the URL. If you ever need any assistance with technical matters of that sort, don’t be afraid to contact me for support. We here at Asylum are humbled and honored to gain link love from our followers and allies.

 

Furthermore, we often find our Selves borrowing, stealing or gleaning inspiration from one another in this field. It is of the utmost importance that we learn to give credit when we do such. I may not place an ‘@’ sign in front of every disparaging word, but I’ve made it my business to acknowledge directly and publicly all those that have assisted in my growth. This is regardless of whether they know or not. I am making them know that they have.

28 thoughts on “5 Things You Should Do Now To Preserve The Integrity Of Black Blogging

  1. 1-5 are all necessary. I can appreciate the way you approached this. Given the volume of work you’ve contributed, for free, in comparison to your retail efforts, the mere fact that you had to write this makes it relevant. People read this blog (as well as your tweets) and are either inspired or appalled but they are serviced by the thoughts you have taken the time to set like the sun. It is not and should never be viewed as wrong for expecting support for what you provide, that you know people are using. Citing the other businesses support system is just another means of offsetting the burden of proof. Things that appear free, online, are actually well-funded, which is why they can continuously grow without having to ask for donations. It’s weird to see it done on Wikipedia when most of these insta-scholars use it as their lifeline daily. Same thing with the blogs and tweets. People willingly pilfer concepts, philosophies and coined terminologies from their “guilty pleasure” sites but act like you’re panhandling when you ask for some help with the upkeep. It is part of our fickle nature as a people and our legacy of dysfunctional/abusive relationships predicated on imbalance. 1 side gives til their gone and the other takes til their spoiled blind to obligation. Reciprocation is not criminal. It is a sign of maturity. As a community, our only hope for survival is to harvest our talents, process them maturely and to begin operating as a network that is self-sustaining based on it’s reciprocal nature. Everything outside of that will keep us separated by ideology and practices but bound by circumstance.

    Good piece, as per usual Bro!

    1. Totally agree, D. It maybe the nature of those that are most savvy in our community(which says a lot). The Black hacker is a LOT different than those of other communities. We tend to be stuck on the free and take portion of that doctrine, and only a small fingertip’s worth of us are at the point of creation and invention. That causes the flock to misunderstand the nature of the product and service provided. I’ve watched the Smashing Community and Envato grow into powerful interglobe realities. There are no excuses. We can do much better. Thanks for the response, D.

  2. 1-5 are all necessary. I can appreciate the way you approached this. Given the volume of work you’ve contributed, for free, in comparison to your retail efforts, the mere fact that you had to write this makes it relevant. People read this blog (as well as your tweets) and are either inspired or appalled but they are serviced by the thoughts you have taken the time to set like the sun. It is not and should never be viewed as wrong for expecting support for what you provide, that you know people are using. Citing the other businesses support system is just another means of offsetting the burden of proof. Things that appear free, online, are actually well-funded, which is why they can continuously grow without having to ask for donations. It’s weird to see it done on Wikipedia when most of these insta-scholars use it as their lifeline daily. Same thing with the blogs and tweets. People willingly pilfer concepts, philosophies and coined terminologies from their “guilty pleasure” sites but act like you’re panhandling when you ask for some help with the upkeep. It is part of our fickle nature as a people and our legacy of dysfunctional/abusive relationships predicated on imbalance. 1 side gives til their gone and the other takes til their spoiled blind to obligation. Reciprocation is not criminal. It is a sign of maturity. As a community, our only hope for survival is to harvest our talents, process them maturely and to begin operating as a network that is self-sustaining based on it’s reciprocal nature. Everything outside of that will keep us separated by ideology and practices but bound by circumstance.

    Good piece, as per usual Bro!

    1. Totally agree, D. It maybe the nature of those that are most savvy in our community(which says a lot). The Black hacker is a LOT different than those of other communities. We tend to be stuck on the free and take portion of that doctrine, and only a small fingertip’s worth of us are at the point of creation and invention. That causes the flock to misunderstand the nature of the product and service provided. I’ve watched the Smashing Community and Envato grow into powerful interglobe realities. There are no excuses. We can do much better. Thanks for the response, D.

  3. 5o5 .. totally agree .. especially the 4-5 .. be aware of all kind of expression and contribute to the effort by “spreading” the movement

    1. Indeed! Without that we can’t make the necessary moves. There is no way that the Black blogosphere hasn’t made more sway over all of the rest. Thanks for the comment!

  4. 5o5 .. totally agree .. especially the 4-5 .. be aware of all kind of expression and contribute to the effort by “spreading” the movement

    1. Indeed! Without that we can’t make the necessary moves. There is no way that the Black blogosphere hasn’t made more sway over all of the rest. Thanks for the comment!

  5. Great list! I’m especially keen on #3 and #5. No matter how many times you stress the importance of COMMENTING ON THE BLOG’S FEEDBACK section, people still refuse to get it, and will click the link to the blog post, read it, and then click back on Twitter to @ you their feedback, rather than on the blog post itself. It’s been extremely difficult to get a good stream of dialogue going because of this, in my experience.

    1. Indeed! It takes a lot of work to generate the type of dialogue that used to be relatively easy due to social media conformity. People seem to have gotten to complacent with their Facebook and Twitter accounts.

  6. Great list! I’m especially keen on #3 and #5. No matter how many times you stress the importance of COMMENTING ON THE BLOG’S FEEDBACK section, people still refuse to get it, and will click the link to the blog post, read it, and then click back on Twitter to @ you their feedback, rather than on the blog post itself. It’s been extremely difficult to get a good stream of dialogue going because of this, in my experience.

    1. Indeed! It takes a lot of work to generate the type of dialogue that used to be relatively easy due to social media conformity. People seem to have gotten to complacent with their Facebook and Twitter accounts.

  7. well, after violating one these rules already by commenting about this post in a tweet (LOL), i must take this challenge by FIRST re-entering The Asylum. it’s been a minute. i love the madness. always have. thank you for a short list first of all and thank you for a DOABLE list second of all. since my blogging skills have yet to develop and tae shape, i do like to share links of others. i have varied tastes so you’ll see blogs that don’t have anything to do with the other. it is, however, disheartening to see i follow a few blogs and may comment but yet i don’t make their “list.” possibly b/c i need to update but i think it’s b/c they follow blogs that resemble theirs. unless it’s specifically set up to keep a “theme,” i find value in seeing diverse interests of my favorite bloggers. opens doors to new networks and ideas. and i do agree about feedback and commenting – not only as a way to show the writer your support and share how you’ve interpreted the entry, but also as a way to generate a discussion to get people talking. that is a very important opportunity that we miss. thank you or highlighting it. as i stated to you in my tweet, these simple points help both the blogger and the reader. thank you for reminding us HOW and WHY it’s important to support. the small feedback i have gotten on my personal blog IS encouraging, but to not receive ANY does leave an empty feeling…so i must make every effort to leave feedback on what i read.

    1. I agree totally. There is always a need for feedback in the realm of the cerebral. I simply don’t know what works if you don’t tell me. Much of the space we refer to as the Black Blogosphere of the Black blogger and Black web content provider would be more controlled by Blacks if those that operated those sites knew better how to serve the niche. Part of that is on us as content providers to better learn our audience’s g-spot, so to speak, but it helps to have a responsive audience. Thanks for responding, dove!!

  8. well, after violating one these rules already by commenting about this post in a tweet (LOL), i must take this challenge by FIRST re-entering The Asylum. it’s been a minute. i love the madness. always have. thank you for a short list first of all and thank you for a DOABLE list second of all. since my blogging skills have yet to develop and tae shape, i do like to share links of others. i have varied tastes so you’ll see blogs that don’t have anything to do with the other. it is, however, disheartening to see i follow a few blogs and may comment but yet i don’t make their “list.” possibly b/c i need to update but i think it’s b/c they follow blogs that resemble theirs. unless it’s specifically set up to keep a “theme,” i find value in seeing diverse interests of my favorite bloggers. opens doors to new networks and ideas. and i do agree about feedback and commenting – not only as a way to show the writer your support and share how you’ve interpreted the entry, but also as a way to generate a discussion to get people talking. that is a very important opportunity that we miss. thank you or highlighting it. as i stated to you in my tweet, these simple points help both the blogger and the reader. thank you for reminding us HOW and WHY it’s important to support. the small feedback i have gotten on my personal blog IS encouraging, but to not receive ANY does leave an empty feeling…so i must make every effort to leave feedback on what i read.

    1. I agree totally. There is always a need for feedback in the realm of the cerebral. I simply don’t know what works if you don’t tell me. Much of the space we refer to as the Black Blogosphere of the Black blogger and Black web content provider would be more controlled by Blacks if those that operated those sites knew better how to serve the niche. Part of that is on us as content providers to better learn our audience’s g-spot, so to speak, but it helps to have a responsive audience. Thanks for responding, dove!!

  9. 1-5 are all essential! The thing is, I probably wouldn’t understand how vital they are if I hadn’t done The Unchained Mind. I had no idea the amount of time, money and intellectual resources that went into maintaining a non-monetary site. #3 was especially an issue for us. I just want to take the time to tell you that all your efforts and honesty are appreciated. My online experience would not be the same without Asylum and it’s gracious Commander. Thank you.

    1. Man! ALWAYS, Lion! Hahah…It is partly my pleasure, partly this really nagging thing in my ear called a purpose. But yeah, I think anyone that has gotten into the nuts and bolts of web content providing immediately begins to feel that wear that can only be absolved by a more than tacit acknowledgement of your efforts.

  10. 1-5 are all essential! The thing is, I probably wouldn’t understand how vital they are if I hadn’t done The Unchained Mind. I had no idea the amount of time, money and intellectual resources that went into maintaining a non-monetary site. #3 was especially an issue for us. I just want to take the time to tell you that all your efforts and honesty are appreciated. My online experience would not be the same without Asylum and it’s gracious Commander. Thank you.

    1. Man! ALWAYS, Lion! Hahah…It is partly my pleasure, partly this really nagging thing in my ear called a purpose. But yeah, I think anyone that has gotten into the nuts and bolts of web content providing immediately begins to feel that wear that can only be absolved by a more than tacit acknowledgement of your efforts.

    1. We all needed this. I have favorite blog writers that I have learn to show more consideration for. Black bloggers…we are all we have.

    1. We all needed this. I have favorite blog writers that I have learn to show more consideration for. Black bloggers…we are all we have.

  11. Good post, thanks for the tips. The reading list on my iPhone is full of Black blogs but I rarely comment. I do, however, realize the importance of feedback in the communication process so I will make sure to offer mine more regularly. It may do me some good to insert myself into the communities of the Black blogs that I frequent. Twitter, FB, etc have caused us to become a bit lazy in the way we relate to one another but they are great tools for disseminating our work. I happened upon The Asylum through Twitter, and I am glad I did. I’ve just added another Black blog to my reading list! I look forward to reading more from you.

    1. I appreciate that!

      I’m the same way at times. I’ve got a bad habit of going to blogs or a posts and just dropping a link back to an article I’ve written here. I’m getting better though. From the phone it can be a bit more or a hassle given touchpad concerns or typepad ones, and some bloggers aren’t great webmasters so it can create technical difficulties. Yet, we have to learn to establish a sense of online camaraderie, community, and that demands communication. I’ve met great people and have altered my life tremendously through my online connections growing further in the offline atmosphere. I recommend everyone doing the same.

      And thanks for commenting!

  12. Good post, thanks for the tips. The reading list on my iPhone is full of Black blogs but I rarely comment. I do, however, realize the importance of feedback in the communication process so I will make sure to offer mine more regularly. It may do me some good to insert myself into the communities of the Black blogs that I frequent. Twitter, FB, etc have caused us to become a bit lazy in the way we relate to one another but they are great tools for disseminating our work. I happened upon The Asylum through Twitter, and I am glad I did. I’ve just added another Black blog to my reading list! I look forward to reading more from you.

    1. I appreciate that!

      I’m the same way at times. I’ve got a bad habit of going to blogs or a posts and just dropping a link back to an article I’ve written here. I’m getting better though. From the phone it can be a bit more or a hassle given touchpad concerns or typepad ones, and some bloggers aren’t great webmasters so it can create technical difficulties. Yet, we have to learn to establish a sense of online camaraderie, community, and that demands communication. I’ve met great people and have altered my life tremendously through my online connections growing further in the offline atmosphere. I recommend everyone doing the same.

      And thanks for commenting!

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